Show all postsFiltered by: Caitlin Russell

Changing Workplaces Review: Potential Changes on the Horizon for Ontario’s Employment and Labour Laws

After much anticipation, the Special Advisors appointed to lead the Ministry of Labour’s Changing Workplaces Review (Review) released their final report (Report) this past Tuesday (May 22, 2017). The Report proposes a number of amendments to the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (ESA) and the Labour Relations Act, 1995 (LRA).

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Guidance From the Ontario Court of Appeal on the Enforceability of Termination Provisions

In our overview of significant cases and trends in 2016, we reported on a series of decisions signalling a move away from the overly technical interpretation of termination clauses in employment contracts, and a return to a more employer-friendly, common sense approach focusing on the intentions of the parties.

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Ontario Court of Appeal Upholds Controversial Human Rights Decision Ordering Reinstatement of Former Employee

The Ontario Court of Appeal has upheld a surprising decision from the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal (“the Tribunal”) that ordered a terminated employee be reinstated to her position with full seniority almost a decade after she had left the workplace.

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Oct 27, 2015
TAGS: AODA
AODA: A Compliance Blitz & Upcoming Deadlines

Ontario’s Ministry of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure has recently announced that they will be conducting targeted audits of retail companies with 500 or more employees to ensure workplaces are compliant with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA). The audits will take place this fall during a three-month blitz. The blitz will require audited employers to show that they have met their current requirements under the AODA as of January 1, 2015.  For a list of AODA requirements as of January 1, 2015, see our previous e-lerts here and here.

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Do Employers Have an Obligation to "Frustrate" an Employment Contract?

Employment contracts can be considered "frustrated" when an unforeseeable event occurs that makes it impossible to fulfill the terms of the contract. Where frustration occurs, an employer can end the employment relationship without any liability other than what is required under statute. Under Ontario’s Employment Standards Act, 2000, employees are entitled to statutory termination and severance pay if their employment contract has been frustrated by injury or illness.

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